Invest in Wheat Ridge

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Wheat Ridge Voters Approve Sales Tax Extension for Capital Improvement Projects

In a resounding victory for Wheat Ridge’s next chapter, residents voiced their overwhelming support by approving the extension of the .5 cent sales tax. This significant decision heralds a new era of investment in essential community improvements, including sidewalks, bike lanes, stormwater management, and road enhancements.

The results of the recent vote were nothing short of extraordinary, with an impressive 70% of voters casting their ballots in favor of extending the sales tax. This enthusiastic endorsement reflects the shared vision of a community committed to enhancing its livability, safety, and overall quality of life.

The extension of the .5 cent sales tax represents a proactive step toward transforming Wheat Ridge into a more walkable and resilient city. The funds generated by this initiative will be strategically allocated to create safer streets, improve connectivity through bike lanes and sidewalks, and bolster the stormwater and drainage systems to reduce flood risks.

Furthermore, the decision to extend the sales tax was driven by an inclusive and community-driven process. Wheat Ridge residents actively participated in shaping the project lists, ensuring that the most pressing needs and priorities were addressed. The campaign also involved extensive outreach efforts, such as Let's Talk and a resident survey, that encouraged meaningful input from all members of the community.

Mayor Bud Starker expressed profound gratitude for the support of the voters, stating, "This is a pivotal moment for Wheat Ridge. The overwhelming approval of the sales tax extension reflects our community's commitment to progress and its belief in the transformative power of our collective efforts. We are excited to embark on these important projects that will elevate Wheat Ridge to new heights."

The approved extension is expected to fund a series of capital improvement projects over the next five to eight years, with residents' feedback incorporated into every step of the process. Wheat Ridge is now poised to enter a new chapter of growth, resilience, and community engagement, thanks to the resounding support of its residents.

As the city eagerly awaits the commencement of these vital projects, it is evident that the future of Wheat Ridge shines brighter than ever. The extension of the .5 cent sales tax is not just a financial decision; it is a reflection of the shared commitment of a community determined to make Wheat Ridge an even better place to live, work, and thrive.

Wheat Ridge Voters Approve Sales Tax Extension for Capital Improvement Projects

In a resounding victory for Wheat Ridge’s next chapter, residents voiced their overwhelming support by approving the extension of the .5 cent sales tax. This significant decision heralds a new era of investment in essential community improvements, including sidewalks, bike lanes, stormwater management, and road enhancements.

The results of the recent vote were nothing short of extraordinary, with an impressive 70% of voters casting their ballots in favor of extending the sales tax. This enthusiastic endorsement reflects the shared vision of a community committed to enhancing its livability, safety, and overall quality of life.

The extension of the .5 cent sales tax represents a proactive step toward transforming Wheat Ridge into a more walkable and resilient city. The funds generated by this initiative will be strategically allocated to create safer streets, improve connectivity through bike lanes and sidewalks, and bolster the stormwater and drainage systems to reduce flood risks.

Furthermore, the decision to extend the sales tax was driven by an inclusive and community-driven process. Wheat Ridge residents actively participated in shaping the project lists, ensuring that the most pressing needs and priorities were addressed. The campaign also involved extensive outreach efforts, such as Let's Talk and a resident survey, that encouraged meaningful input from all members of the community.

Mayor Bud Starker expressed profound gratitude for the support of the voters, stating, "This is a pivotal moment for Wheat Ridge. The overwhelming approval of the sales tax extension reflects our community's commitment to progress and its belief in the transformative power of our collective efforts. We are excited to embark on these important projects that will elevate Wheat Ridge to new heights."

The approved extension is expected to fund a series of capital improvement projects over the next five to eight years, with residents' feedback incorporated into every step of the process. Wheat Ridge is now poised to enter a new chapter of growth, resilience, and community engagement, thanks to the resounding support of its residents.

As the city eagerly awaits the commencement of these vital projects, it is evident that the future of Wheat Ridge shines brighter than ever. The extension of the .5 cent sales tax is not just a financial decision; it is a reflection of the shared commitment of a community determined to make Wheat Ridge an even better place to live, work, and thrive.

  • Ballot Language for Sales Tax Extension

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    The language below is exactly how it will appear on the ballot:

    Shall the City of Wheat Ridge debt be increased by up to $75 million, with a repayment cost of not more than $125 Million, and shall the one-half cent (0.50%) sales and use tax approved by the voters of the city in 2016 be extended, with the proceeds of such tax, and other sales and use tax revenue as the city may determine, be used for the payment of the 2017 bonds issued under the authority of the 2016 election as well as the debt authorized by the this question, such debt to be issued for capital improvement projects of the city including:

    • Sidewalk, bike lane and street improvements on primary street corridors such as 32nd Ave., 38th Ave., 44th Ave, and Youngfield St.
    • Filling sidewalk gaps and other sidewalk repair and replacement with an emphasis on major pedestrian corridors and routes to schools.
    • Drainage and floodplain infrastructure improvements at priority locations in the city.

    And, to the extent funds are available, to pay down the 2017 bonds, and shall such one-half of once cent (0.50%) sales and use tax expire upon the earlier to occur of the payment in full of the bonds or December 31, 2043; such debt to be sold in one series or more at a price above, below, or equal to the principal amount of such debt and on such terns and conditions as the city may determine, including provisions for redemption of the debt prior to maturity with or without payment of a premium of not exceed 3.00%; and shall the revenues raised by such sales and use tax and proceeds of such debt, and any other revenue used to pay such debt, including any interest and investment income therefrom, be collected and spent by the city as a voter-approved change pursuant to Article X, Section 20 of the Colorado Constitution?

    YES: _____


    NO: ______



  • TABOR Notice Submitted to Jefferson County

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    TO ALL REGISTERED VOTERS

    NOTICE OF ELECTION TO INCREASE DEBT ON A REFERRED MEASURE

    CITY OF WHEAT RIDGE

    JEFFERSON COUNTY, COLORADO

    Election date: November 7, 2023

    Election hours: 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

    Local election office address and phone number:

    Designated Election Official: Steve Kirkpatrick, Wheat Ridge City Clerk, 7500 West 29th Avenue, Wheat Ridge, CO 80033; telephone number 303-235-2823

    Ballot title and text:

    Ballot Issue No. 2J

    SHALL THE CITY OF WHEAT RIDGE DEBT BE INCREASED BY UP TO $75 MILLION, WITH A REPAYMENT COST OF NOT MORE THAN $125 MILLION, AND SHALL THE ONE-HALF OF ONE CENT (0.50%) SALES AND USE TAX APPROVED BY THE VOTERS OF THE CITY IN 2016 BE EXTENDED, WITH THE PROCEEDS OF SUCH TAX, AND OTHER SALES AND USE TAX REVENUE AS THE CITY MAY DETERMINE, BE USED FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE 2017 BONDS ISSUED UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF THE 2016 ELECTION AS WELL AS THE DEBT AUTHORIZED BY THIS QUESTION, SUCH DEBT TO BE ISSUED FOR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS OF THE CITY INCLUDING:

    SIDEWALK, BIKE LANE AND STREET IMPROVEMENTS ON PRIMARY STREET CORRIDORS SUCH AS 32ND AVE., 38TH AVE., 44TH AVE, AND YOUNGFIELD ST.;


    FILLING SIDEWALK GAPS AND OTHER SIDEWALK REPAIR AND REPLACEMENT WITH AN EMPHASIS ON MAJOR PEDESTRIAN CORRIDORS AND ROUTES TO SCHOOLS;


    DRAINAGE AND FLOODPLAIN INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENTS AT PRIORITY LOCATIONS IN THE CITY;


    AND, TO THE EXTENT FUNDS ARE AVAILABLE, TO PAY DOWN THE 2017 BONDS, AND SHALL SUCH ONE-HALF OF ONE CENT (0.50%) SALES AND USE TAX EXPIRE UPON THE EARLIER TO OCCUR OF THE PAYMENT IN FULL OF THE BONDS OR DECEMBER 31, 2043; SUCH DEBT TO BE SOLD IN ONE SERIES OR MORE AT A PRICE ABOVE, BELOW OR EQUAL TO THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF SUCH DEBT AND ON SUCH TERMS AND CONDITIONS AS THE CITY MAY DETERMINE, INCLUDING PROVISIONS FOR REDEMPTION OF THE DEBT PRIOR TO MATURITY WITH OR WITHOUT PAYMENT OF A PREMIUM OF NOT TO EXCEED 3.00%; AND SHALL THE REVENUES RAISED BY SUCH SALES AND USE TAX AND PROCEEDS OF SUCH DEBT, AND ANY OTHER REVENUE USED TO PAY SUCH DEBT, INCLUDING ANY INTEREST AND INVESTMENT INCOME THEREFROM, BE COLLECTED AND SPENT BY THE CITY AS A VOTER-APPROVED REVENUE CHANGE PURSUANT TO ARTICLE X, SECTION 20 OF THE COLORADO CONSTITUTION?

    Actual historical and current estimated fiscal year spending information:


    Year Fiscal Year Spending

    2019 (actual) $48,365,925

    2020 (actual) $51,918,759

    2021 (actual) $73,203,273

    2022 (actual) $77,877,468

    2023 (current year estimated) $78,131,183


    Overall percentage change in fiscal year spending

    over the five-year period from 2019 through 2023: 61.54%

    Overall dollar change in fiscal year spending

    over the five-year period from 2019 through 2023: $29,765,258

    Information regarding bonded debt proposed by Ballot Issue 2J:

    Principal amount: $75,000,000

    Maximum annual repayment cost: $7,700,000

    Maximum total repayment cost: $125,000,000

    Information regarding current bonded debt:

    Principal balance: $14,980,000

    Maximum annual repayment cost: $3,700,000

    Maximum remaining total repayment cost: $16,498,200

    Summaries of written comments filed with the election officer:

    The following summaries were prepared from comments filed by persons FOR Ballot Issue 2J:

    Vote Yes on 2J, an extension of an existing tax to fund critical public infrastructure projects in Wheat Ridge.

    The City of Wheat Ridge’s journey toward a brighter future, hinges upon investments in capital improvement projects. These projects are not just about brick and mortar; they are the foundation upon which we will build the next chapter of Wheat Ridge's story. They are the catalysts for progress, rejuvenating our infrastructure, fueling economic growth, and elevating our quality of life to new heights.

    Investing in bike lanes and sidewalk improvements is more than a mere convenience; it's about crafting a city where walkability is a way of life. It's about making our streets safer and more inviting, encouraging active lifestyles, and weaving a tapestry that connects our neighborhoods, schools, and businesses, bringing us closer as a community.

    Stormwater and drainage improvements, though often overlooked, are the unsung heroes that will ensure that our next chapter is one of resilience. By investing in these projects, we can remove homes from the floodplain list, shielding our residences and properties from potential disaster. Moreover, this reduces the cost of homeowner insurance, offering tangible financial relief to our residents.

    What sets this initiative apart is the profound connection it has with our residents. The project lists were determined by the people of the City of Wheat Ridge, not City staff. Through community outreach efforts like Let's Talk and the resident survey, resident voices resonated loud and clear. This is

    democracy in action, a testament to the city’s commitment to making resident priorities city priorities.

    The decision to seek an extension of the .5 cent sales tax was a direct response to resident feedback. Survey results left no room for doubt, with an astonishing 79% of voters expressing their resounding support for this effort. Voter endorsement is a testament to the shared vision the city holds for our community's future.

    In conclusion, the extension of the .5 cent sales tax isn't just a financial matter; it's an unmissable opportunity for Wheat Ridge to script the next thrilling chapter in its history. It's an investment in a city where walkability, resilience, and community engagement reign supreme. It's a bold leap forward, powered by resident input and our shared vision for a city that shines brighter with each passing chapter.

    Let's stand united and vote in favor of this extension, propelling the City of Wheat Ridge into the transformative chapter that awaits.

    We can get all of these projects completed with NO TAX INCREASE, just an extension of an already existing tax. Vote YES ON 2J.

    The following summaries were prepared from comments filed by persons AGAINST Ballot Issue 2J:


    No comments were filed by the Constitutional deadline.


  • How Were the Projects on the Ballot Decided?

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    The unfunded capital improvement projects being proposed in the extension of the .5 cent sales tax were developed as a direct result from resident feedback and deliberate planning.

    Planning and outreach efforts included the following:

    NRS Update (2019)

    The Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy (NRS) began in the early 2000s with the goal of facilitating a healthy housing market, attracting commercial investment, and supporting a vibrant community. The 2019 NRS was a report card or checkup on that progress. The city looked at the data and took the temperature of residents.

    The NRS raised the bar in terms of public engagement. Led by the steering committee, feedback relied on small group meeting, one-on-one conversations, open houses, and 1000 survey responses.

    More details here: https://www.ci.wheatridge.co.us/276/NRS-Update

    Resident Survey (2021)

    Currently, the city is soliciting feedback from randomly selected residents for the 2023 Resident Survey. The 2021 survey, assessed resident satisfaction with community characteristics and amenities, evaluated Wheat Ridge local government and employees, and helped the city further understand resident’s priorities regarding city government services.

    Learn more here: https://www.ci.wheatridge.co.us/258/Resident-Survey

    Let’s Talk (2021-2023)

    This program documents neighborhood-specific issues and opportunities by collecting resident feedback through community meetings, neighborhood pop-ups, and surveys. The process asks open-ended questions and builds trust with residents. So far over 1,500 residents have engaged.

    Goals established at the onset:

    • Develop a thorough, well documented understanding of the issues and opportunities at the neighborhood level

    • Build trust between city staff and neighborhoods through demonstration that the city is listening and being responsive;

    • Better empower neighborhoods to take initiative and work effectively with the city for positive outcomes that respond to neighborhood changes;

    • Ensure that all neighborhoods in the city have an opportunity for focused listening and responsive actions from the city within approximately two year cycles; and

    • Ensure that the feedback received during the engagement "blitz" is robust and represents a diversity of opinions in each neighborhood.

    Learn more about the Let's Talk Program here: https://whatsupwheatridge.com/lets-talk

    Lutheran Subarea Plan (2022)

    The Lutheran Legacy Campus master plan document reflects the vision of the community and was created using a market study to ensure that the plan is realistic and has the best possible chance of coming to pass. The document outlines a framework for future development. It is not a site plan, it does not prescribe specific uses, nor is it a zoning document. It describes what the community likes and dislikes, it articulates goals and desires, and it creates guardrails for future development. Ultimately, it communicates to future owners the community’s expectations, without which the property could be developed in a way that runs counter to community wishes. To review the plan please visit: https://www.ci.wheatridge.co.us/1788/Lutheran-Campus

    Affordable Housing Strategy (2023)

    The Wheat Ridge City Council adopted the Affordable Housing Strategy and Action Plan on January 9, 2023, as a guiding document to address housing affordability in Wheat Ridge. The process started in early 2022 and included opportunities for public input, discussions with over 20 housing developers, and four City Council discussions in 2022. The plan can be viewed here: https://whatsupwheatridge.com/housing

    44th Avenue Subarea Plan (2023)

    This plan includes land use recommendations and identifies areas appropriate for commercial, mixed use, and residential development. Through public input it was identified there is a clear desire to protect the character of the existing lower density neighborhoods, a willingness for townhome and newer development on the corridor, and an understanding that attracting retail and dining options will require more rooftops.

    The most well supported recommendations relate to mobility improvements including, wider, safer, shaded, continuous sidewalk, improved access within and into the corridor, improved tabor bridge, and improved access to the creek.

    The full plan can be viewed here: https://www.ci.wheatridge.co.us/1821/44th-Avenue

    Open Space Management Plan (2023)

    The purpose of the Open Space Management Plan is to create a bold vision for the future of the Wheat Ridge Greenbelt, Clear Creek Trail, and open space assets. It balances recreation use with resource protection, while incorporating strategies for long-term sustainability and stewardship.

    The plan incorporated community engagement, an evaluation of existing conditions and future opportunities, and the identification of alternatives and solutions to existing challenges.

    For more information visit: https://whatsupwheatridge.com/open-space-management-plan-2022-update

    Facilities Master Plan (2023)

    (I'm not able to find this) Results from this internal document have found that city own facility needs have exceeded available space, many components are at or beyond expected service life, improvements will require significant financial investment, and there is opportunity to reimagine spaces.

    Major Themes Developed As a Result of the Above

    Corridors

    The City of Wheat Ridge has repeatedly heard that corridors are an issue requiring attention. Specifically, there’s interest in giving attention to local streets—not state highways—to 44th and 38th and Youngfield, 32nd and 29th.

    It’s interesting because in the NRS survey in early 2019 among these corridors, 38th Avenue east of Wadsworth received the highest marks among other primary corridor segments, but the neighborhoods east of Wadsworth certainly expressed through Let’s Talk a sense that the Main Street vision on 38th Avenue still feels incomplete.

    The segment west of Wadsworth has long been a priority across a few of these efforts. The 38 West or 38 Walk project will come to Council for contract award and budget supplemental to kick off a conceptual design process.

    The NRS survey ranked 44th Avenue as second to worst among the corridors. There are a range of improvements that have come up, both linear and targeted including, conditions east to west on 44th and even on the frontage road, improved crosswalks on 44th, improved crossing of i-70—the tabor street bridge as long been mentioned as a barrier with a lack of bike/ped facilities, and targeted medians near the truck stop.

    Youngfield – not only aesthetic improvements for which design is underway, but sidewalk improvements along Yougnfield – a sense that it connects or could connect the neighborhood to Applewood Village, CCC, and the creek in a better way.

    Mobility

    We’re seeing interest city wide and through Let’s Talk feedback in pedestrian mobility access for localized projects. While there is certainly some disagreement at the local street or block level as to whether there should be sidewalks, we see significantly more consensus in public feedback when we take a broader view.

    There is a common theme in a desire for improved sidewalk connections city wide --- particularly on collectors and arterials. This has been expressed through the bike ped master plan and in Let’s Talk.

    During the Lutheran plan, that was a key conversation related to surrounding streets, including Dudley and 32nd Avenue – part of the recommendation for Transportation Demand Management in the Lutheran area is to invest in multimodal infrastructure.

    Floodplain & Drainage

    One of the highest priority areas for floodplain mitigation is near the Clearvale neighborhood. This area has many homes within the floodway and the 100-year floodplain which not only raises insurance rates, but also inhibits investment in properties.

    With the current mapping, a project could remove 48 houses from the floodway and an additional 55 houses and seven multifamily buildings from the floodplain.

    During the Anderson Park Let’s Talk Blitz the highest ranked action item was to Improve Clear Creek North of 44th Avenue to Reduce Flood Impacts on Property. The same project was raised as part of 44th planning.

    Parks & Open Space

    Results from parks and open space studies and resident impacts concluded that general access to Clear Creek Greenbelt be increased. This includes formalizing some social trails and installing a trail head at Otis St. A need for a crosswalk at Kipling to the Clear Creek Trail was identified. Resident feedback also stressed the need to balance amenities with access, habitat restoration.

    Public Facilities

    Identified projects include a Parks and Recreation Center expansion to support new fitness/gym facilities and a additional space for camps. This plan does not include an additional pool. It also identified a need for a reimagined City Hall, a cultural center, and a public works building to support materials and vehicle storage.

Page last updated: 28 Nov 2023, 05:24 PM